dfm covers
 
 

Inconsistent Tool Performance Impacts Evidence

Written by DFM Team

Inconsistent Tool Performance Impacts Evidence

Digital forensic tools are relied upon to collect evidence for the investigation report and potential submission to legal processes for scrutiny and use. These tools vary widely in their origins. Some standardised tools have become more acceptable than others, and other non-standardised tools less so. The result is that public confidence has been built around consistent acceptance of evidence that has been produced by particular tools. A big debate rages around open source tools and proprietary tools, as to which is the more reliable. In practice proprietary tools have greater acceptance but may not be able to do all the tasks required for evidential extraction in particular situations. The evolving nature of information technology and the innovation of many different data presentation and storage types, such as social networking, cloud, and the Internet of things, is exacerbating the necessity of mixing open source tools with proprietary tools. Regardless of the tools being used we have observed in laboratory testing that different versions of the same tool can provide different evidence from the same target source.


Find out more - subscribe to DFM today and read the full article. Or if you're a subscriber, login and read the article online.


 
Please make cache directory writable.
 

Submit an Article

Call for Articles

We are keen to publish new articles from all aspects of digital forensics. Click to contact us with your completed article or article ideas.

Featured Book

Learning iOS Forensics

A practical hands-on guide to acquire and analyse iOS devices with the latest forensic techniques and tools.

Meet the Authors

Mark Osborne

Mark Osborne is the author of 'How To Cheat at Managing Information Security'

 

Coming up in the Next issue of Digital Forensics Magazine

Coming up in Issue 36 on sale from February 2018:


Crowd Sourcing Digital Evidence The Risk v The Reward

All digital devices used today can be considered as a potential source for digital evidence. Andrew Ryan investigates the current state in the art of crowd sourced digital evidence. Read More »

Recovery of Forensic Artifacts from Deleted Jump-List in Windows 10

Jump-Lists are widely discussed in forensics community since the release of Windows 7 and are having more capabilities to reveal forensics artifacts in Windows 10. Read More »

Subscribe today


Voice Biometrics

This article looks at the research and development in the field of Voice Biometrics and Speech Analytics, specifically Speaker Identification, Language and Gender Identification, Speech-to-Text Transcription, Keyword Spotting, and others. Read More »

Every Issue
Plus the usual Competition, Book Reviews, 360, IRQ, Legal

Click here to read more about the next issue