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In This Issue


Issue 15 - Out now!

Here's a quick review of some of the main articles within Issue 15


Issue 15 of Digital Forensics Magazine brings new techniques and ideas to the industry. Subscribe today to ensure you get digital access, or if you want, subscribe to the print edition. Find out more at our subscriptions pages.

Here's just a few of the fantastic articles inside Issue 15...


Cryptographic Key Recovery
The past decade has seen a complete transformation in human communications. The notion of carrying around a handset to connect you to people on the other side of the world would have been dismissed as ridiculous 100 years ago. But nowadays people rely on mobile phones to communicate.

The ever-increasing media that is available poses a number of problems for investigators who have to deal with criminals that are using their mobiles to mastermind operations and carry out illegal activities. The ‘mobile explosion’ that has occurred over the last decade has meant that investigators have had to keep up with the advances in technology to stay one step ahead of the tech-savvy criminal.


Google Desktop Forensics
Over time, as the amount of data stored by the average computer user grew considerably, searching large amounts of data became a slow task that did not always return the desired results. The need for faster and more accurate searching led to the development of desktop search utilities such as Google Desktop. As Microsoft Windows improved its searching capability by including a similar indexing service, desktop search utilities were no longer needed or as popular as they once were. Google Desktop was discontinued as of September 14, 2011; it is no longer updated or supported, and is no longer available for download via Google’s website. However, existing Google Desktop installations will still function, and Google Desktop may still be downloaded (via other software download sites), and used. At this time, DC3 continues to receive cases where Google Desktop is still installed, or its artifacts have been left behind.


Fuzzing Risks in Software Tools
The residual risk of software failure after release is managed by giving the end user controls that help treat potential vulnerabilities. The most obvious is the ability of the user to refresh an application or reboot an operating system. In addition patches and upgrades are released during the life cycle of a software tool to assure the business continuity of the product. Our research question arose because of an unproven concern that bugs in software could be exploited for anti-forensic activity.


Tigerscheme Not For Profit Certification
Tiger Scheme is a not-for-profi t organization that provides industry-recognized certifi cation of specialist security practitioners. The Scheme was set up in response to a perceived need for wider recognition of the skills of technical vulnerability analysts ("penetration testers"). The existence of a skills gap in this area has been well documented, and further recognized in the UK National Cyber Security Strategy, which states a clear objective for the UK “to have the cross-cutting knowledge, skills and capabilities it needs to underpin all our cyber security objectives”.


Steganography Revealed
Along with the continual increase in the number of crimes involving computers, the amount of digital storage media to be examined has grown exponentially. In the not too distant past, the amount of digital media to be examined was measured in megabytes.

As storage technology continues to advance and the capacity of hard drives continues to increase, the amount of digital media to be examined continues to grow with no end in sight. Currently, it is not uncommon for examiners to have hundreds of gigabytes of media to examine and, in some cases, they may be confronted with terabytes of information. This is a trend that will continue to grow and eventually reach petabytes of information if it has not done so already.



Plus all the regular features, news, Robservations, our legal section and Apple Autopsy...


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Featured Book

Learning iOS Forensics

A practical hands-on guide to acquire and analyse iOS devices with the latest forensic techniques and tools.

Meet the Authors

Noemi Kuncik

Noemi Kuncik is an IT Forensics Specialist at Grant Thornton

 

Coming up in the Next issue of Digital Forensics Magazine

Coming up in Issue 41 on sale from November 2019:


Forensic Syntactical & Linguistic Investigation

Mark Iwazko presents a case study regarding a Forensic Syntactical & Linguistic investigation: Instructed by the Moscow General Council of one of the actual big four accountants. Read More »

Forensic Readiness: A Proactive Approach to Support Forensic Digital Analysis

An increasing number of criminal actions are inflicting financial and brand damage to organizations around the globe. An impressive number of such cases do not reach the courts, mainly because of the organization’s inefficiency to produce robust digital evidences that are acceptable in the courts of law. Read More »

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Using Error-Patterns for Attribution: An Applied Linguistics Technique

Corpus Linguistics within Second Language Acquisition has developed models of error patterns made by defined groups of second language learners. This knowledge base can be leveraged by a knowledgeable analyst to attribute content to a subset of authors. Read More »

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